The Nuanced George Bush

The latest Early Warning Report written by Richard Maybury came today and has the fascinating observation that President Bush is back to warning about meddling in other countries. This was the reason people in the Middle East hate us and seems to go along with the thoughts of Michael Scheuer, author of Through Our Enemies’ Eyes, that Osama bin Laden hates the U.S. for three reasons: We are allies with Israel; we have sullied the holy land of Saudi Arabia; and we have supported dictators and despots that have killed and robbed Muslim people of their freedoms.On August 7th President Bush and Secretary of State Rice Discuss the Middle East Crisis in Crawford, Texas:

And as far as this administration is concerned, we clearly see the problem and we’re going to continue to work to advance stable, free countries. We don’t expect every country to look like the United States, but we do want countries to accept some basic conditions for a vibrant society — human rights, human decency, the power of the people to determine the fate of their governments. And, admittedly, this is hard work because it flies in the face of previous policy, which basically says stability is more important than form of government. And as a result of that policy, anger and resentment bubbled forth with an attack, with a series of attacks, the most dramatic of which was on September the 11th.

On August 31st President Bush Addresses American Legion National Convention at Salt Lake City, Utah:

To understand the struggle unfolding in the Middle East, we need to look at the recent history of the region. For a half- century, America’s primary goal in the Middle East was stability. This was understandable at the time; we were fighting the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and it was important to support Middle Eastern governments that rejected communism. Yet, over the decades, an undercurrent of danger was rising in the Middle East. Much of the region was mired in stagnation and despair. A generation of young people grew up with little hope to improve their lives, and many fell under the sway of radical extremism. The terrorist movement multiplied in strength, and resentment that had simmered for years boiled over into violence across the world.

On September 9th President Bush Discusses Global War on Terror in Washington, D.C.:

Fifth, we’re working to deny terrorists new recruits, by defeating their hateful ideology and spreading the hope of freedom — by spreading the hope of freedom across the Middle East. For decades, American policy sought to achieve peace in the Middle East by pursuing stability at the expense of liberty. The lack of freedom in that region helped create conditions where anger and resentment grew, and radicalism thrived, and terrorists found willing recruits. And we saw the consequences on September the 11th, when the terrorists brought death and destruction to our country. The policy wasn’t working.

In checking his latest pronouncement about the Middle East and Iraq, President Bush changes the message subtly when he discusses Global War on Terror in Washington, D.C.:

Iraq is not the reason the terrorists are at war against us. They are at war against us because they hate everything America stands for — and we stand for freedom. We stand for people to worship freely. One of the great things about America is, you’re equally American if you’re a Jew, a Muslim, a Christian, an agnostic or an atheist. What a powerful statement to the world about the compassion of the American people that you’re free to choose the religion you want in our country. They can’t stand the thought that people can go into the public square in America and express their differences with government. They can’t stand the thought that the people get to decide the future of our country by voting. Freedom bothers them because their ideology is the opposite of liberty, it is the opposite of freedom. And they don’t like it because we know they know we stand in their way of their ambitions in the Middle East, their ambitions to spread their hateful ideology as a caliphate from Spain to Indonesia.

Bush seems to be reflecting the divide in this country. On the one hand they hate us for the stability we sought in the Cold War by supporting despots which deprived their young people of economic development that produced simmering anger. On the other hand it is a clash of civilizations. They hate us for the freedoms we enjoy. Freedom of religion, speech and thought, but also the freedom to be morally corrupt.Maybe, Bush is trying to get the people of this country united against the terrorists. The more liberal blame the anger on poverty and people like me blame it on the religion of Islam. If we are to be successful, we need to be primarily speaking with one voice.Early Warning Report Richard Maybury Michael Scheuer Through Our Enemies’ Eyes Israel Iraq Mover Mike

3 Responses to “The Nuanced George Bush”

  1. Your three premises are too simplistic. If I remove the fear of spiders, you’re telling me that that will stop terrorism? We have peace in America, but I’m still fearful of spiders! Freedom does not maintain peace. Ask a cop.

    You have the Bush policy wrong and you might go back and read what he said above.

  2. The only way to stop terrorism is by removing fear.

    The only way to stop fear is by having peace.

    The only way to maintain peace is to have Freedom

    Seems simple doesn’t it? The only problem is the Bush policy is base upon fear, nationalism and the military. A recipe which in many respects goes against what they want to achieve (supposely of world peace)? But its their power base and as such, by generating more terrorism they end up getting stronger… Bizarre world we live in.

  3. Peace is something you first have to make…. and then have to keep. “Freedom” is something you have to fight for. Bullies, tyrants, despots disturb the peace in their quest for power and to usurp the freedom of others. There is no final fix, peace and freedom are ever and always ongoing concerns.

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