The Reality

The newspapers are filled with lookbacks at 2006, the biggest stories, the most blogged words, the best toys, cars, stocks, mutual funds, ad infinitum. Me, I am more pessimistic about the trend and the future than ever before.

We argue over politics, but it makes no difference who gets elected. We will spend more money that we don’t have, we will send more men to foreign countries to die, we will have more regulations, and our government will employ more people. Those who will run for the presidency will turn my stomach, the schools will want more money, yet only 50% of the students can pass minimum standards at graduation. The hoax that is global warming will make headlines and the few who will say anything intelligent about the lack of proof will be overwhelmed.

In Socialism Again, J. R. Nyquist shares my pessimism.

Over the past thousand years the West has “evolved” from the simple Iron Age economy of post-Roman feudalism to the ultra-complex global economy of today. This development occurred because economic freedom and governments with built-in checks and balances gave ordinary people a chance to build something for themselves and their posterity. But that wasn’t all. Aristocratic and Christian idealism successfully mitigated the usual course of enslavement and pillaging. The lords and nobles of England, in particular, exercised a noble self-limitation (and constitutional restraint). Quite logically, the fastest development of wealth went to the freest and ablest societies, the ones least encumbered by tyrannical or rapacious overlords. England and its offshoot, the United States, were the leading countries in this process.So why do I say that this process approaches a dead end?

My analysis has nothing to do with resource depletion, global warming or Marxian pauperization. We can all see that Western ideals of freedom have been eroding away. Welfare entitlements, environmentalism and wealth redistribution have proven irresistible. Liberty is giving way to regulation. The noble creed of aristocratic culture based on a mix of classical and Christian ideas has fallen before a demagogic cycle of political promises, a regime of gross flattery aimed at the common man, increased government bureaucracy, further promises, and further bureaucracy. The education system follows the logic of socialism, with a subtle tendency to indoctrinate the next generation. The economic system is Keynesian, with no long-term future and no guiding principle other than short-term enjoyment. Here the logic of Late Antiquity, with its emphasis on bread and circuses, finds its Electronic Age variant. The resulting culture presents us with a stupefied general public and a debased politics. Where there is a will to confront present dangers there is no wit. And more often than not there is neither the will nor the wit. When we look at immigration policy, trade and national security (particular pertaining to counterintelligence), the government will not admit that dangers threaten because democracy hasn’t the stomach for tough decisions.

Nyquist concludes with these words:

Things are going to get very nasty before they get better. And don’t expect a political leader to say anything truthful about the situation until our illusions are thoroughly extinguished.

I will continue to write about our preference for socialism, the hoax of global warming, the debasing of our currency, the mess we call politics, the government’s lies about inflation and the coming rise of gold. However, I don’t expect to change many minds. The babble of the stupid is just too loud!


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