Quakes OnTwo Sides Of The Columbia

map 2.4 2007/08/31 06:13:50 47.568N 119.785W 0.7 23 km (14 mi) ESE of Waterville, WA

map 2.2 2007/08/31 04:17:29 45.118N 120.942W 18.9 13 km ( 8 mi) ESE of Maupin, OR

map 1.2 2007/08/31 00:02:17 45.129N 120.921W 16.5 14 km ( 8 mi) ESE of Maupin, OR

Maupin Earthquake Mover Mike

Update:


5 Responses to “Quakes OnTwo Sides Of The Columbia”

  1. Earlier I wrote to you about Earthquake Point at Entiat, Washington which is along the Columbia River.

    Waterville is across the river from Entiat and you climb 2600 feet up into the high wheat fields.

    The two towns are, I think about 10 miles apart.

    Entiat’s elevation is 800 feet, so you see that you make a steep climb in a short distance.

    Out of curiosity I checked the depth of the two earthquakes.

    Entiat depth: 2.4 miles

    Waterville depth: 5.3 miles

    I googled to try and find some info about fault lines in Washington State but came up with a blank.

    I assume there must be a fault line running through that area.

  2. Laureen, I looked also but was unable so far to find anything. I’ll let you know if I do.

    Bev &Mike Landfair

  3. There is a series of fault lines that run through the Entiat area. They actually start near Moses Lake and run all the way through the Lake Chelan area. The slide ridge area has a few minor fault lines that run on the west side of the mountain. There is also a fault that runs near the Wapato Point peninsula. There is a series of faults that are in the area of Entiat that are short, but defined. The faults are all short ( a few miles in length to about 50 miles in length I believe) with them in stagered adjacent clusters. The Entiat, Chelan and Moses Coulee are the more active of the faults. It was just a couple of weeks ago that there were two 3.2 earthquakes that were centered one south of Coulee City and one west of Ellensburg. These are just a few of the areas that are shoeing some activity.

  4. Chris, thanks very much for that info.

  5. My goodness, has it been 2 1/2 years since I first found Mike’s blog about earthquakes.
    I remember searching for some information about the Maupin quakes. Mike was the only one commenting on them.
    In that time span I have spent Thanksgiving at Wapato point. Traveled numerous times up and down both the west and east sides of the Columbia.
    I still don’t like driving through the earthquake area of Entiat. I find it creepy.

    When I travel through Chelan, I think of what an earthquake could do to the outlet of the lake and the little town of Chelan Falls down below.

    Last year I took a side trip from Brewster, through Bridgeport, up over the high hills to Grand Coulee and then back through Waterville.
    Some people consider the area desolate, but I find it a geological fascination.
    There are the high wheat covered hills, with tall single pillars of rock left by the glaciers.
    They truly do look like lonely sentinels from an ancient time.
    The small coulees with their brush growing along the trickle of water, provide habitat for the deer, quail and pheasants and a break in the scenery.
    And way down below, winds the third largest river in our nation.
    The east and west sides of the Columbia are totally different looking in landscape, but both sides seem to be prone to earthquakes.
    Yes, Chris Willoughby, considering the steepness of the terrain, I would think the faults would have to be short.

    Mike, if you and Bev, enjoy the heat, you really should rent one of the beautiful homes along Lake Chelan for a weekend.
    It won’t be as cheap as Mexico.

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