Where Does All That CO2 Come From?

Today’s Oregonian has a front page story whose headline reads: Acidity levels on West Coast rising faster than scientists had estimated.

Scientists have known for a while that greenhouse gases associated with global warming steadily make ocean water more acidic, a threat to coral, shellfish and smaller shell-forming creatures that serve as food for young salmon and other fish.

On Thursday, a team of researchers from the Northwest and elsewhere delivered worse news: The acidity is much higher than expected in the ocean just off the West Coast, hitting the relatively shallow waters of the fruitful continental shelf during spring and summer.

I am sure the scientists are referring to carbon dioxide, which has been steadily rising and now constitutes 38 parts per 100.000. Man, the main contributor to this increase by burning fossil fuels, is increasing the CO2 level one (1) part per 100,000 every 5 years. Soon, by the year 2018 CO2 levels will reach 40 parts per 100,000! Scary isn’t it? That’s a 5.2% increase every 10 years. Don’t you wish you could get that kind of return on your CD? What, you are getting 5% per year? Well 5.2% every 10 years isn’t very good is it?

When I read the article I recalled that volcanoes emit CO2 in large quantities, but certainly global warming activists will argue that the amounts don’t equal anthropomorphic contributions. But hold on a moment. 70% of the earth is underwater and NewScientist Environment reported in July, 2007 Thousand of new volcanoes revealed beneath the waves

The true extent to which the ocean bed is dotted with volcanoes has been revealed by researchers who have counted 201,055 underwater cones. This is over 10 times more than have been found before.

The team estimates that in total there could be about 3 million submarine volcanoes, 39,000 of which rise more than 1000 metres over the sea bed.

Maybe, we should reassess the impact of all these volcanoes on the CO2 levels of the seas that is changing the acidity levels.

In February, 2007 The USGS wrote on this topic and said

Our studies show that globally, volcanoes on land and under the sea release a total of about 200 million tonnes of CO2 annually (compared to the global fossil fuel CO2 emissions of 26.8 billion tonnes).

Does that study take into account the new estimate of 3,000,000 undersea volcanoes. If not that 200 Million tonnes could be too low by at least an order of magnitude!

2 Responses to “Where Does All That CO2 Come From?”

  1. “Does that study take into account the new estimate of 3,000,000 undersea volcanoes. If not that 200 Million tonnes could be too low by at least an order of magnitude!”

    Just for fun that should have been “magmatude”. Okay, I’ll go sit in the corner now.

  2. LOL

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