Scientists Study Small Earthquakes Near Hanford

OPB quotes scientist:
(Alan) Rohay thinks underground pressure is cracking layers of basalt laid down by lava flows thousands of years ago.

Alan Rohay: “It can’t support the stress anymore and the stress is picked up by ones nearby either above or below. They in turn have that increased stress and so they break and so it ends up being a snap, crackle, pop kind of thing.”

So far today we have half a dozen quales in the Richland area:

map 1.5 2009/03/24 10:24:24 46.389N 119.281W 0.1 12 km ( 8 mi) NNE of West Richland, WA
map 1.7 2009/03/24 04:39:05 46.389N 119.300W 0.4 12 km ( 7 mi) NNE of West Richland, WA
map 2.2 2009/03/24 04:13:53 46.387N 119.262W 0.9 12 km ( 8 mi) N of Richland, WA
map 1.2 2009/03/24 03:58:35 46.389N 119.279W 0.0 12 km ( 8 mi) N of Richland, WA
map 1.9 2009/03/24 03:51:19 46.392N 119.293W 3.3 12 km ( 7 mi) NNE of West Richland, WA
map 1.0 2009/03/24 03:50:44 46.396N 119.298W 0.9 12 km ( 8 mi) NNE of West Richland, WA

2 Responses to “Scientists Study Small Earthquakes Near Hanford”

  1. sort of make me wonder if it was an old fault that was reactivated by pumping wastes deep in the earth thinking that would be the end of the story .. same thing happened near a chemical weapons plant in Colorado in the 60s-70s, it was in a key lecture in an introductory geology course I took many years ago

  2. This winter, I have been traveling the Washington side of the Columbia River Gorge, once a week.
    I have been noticing, small, very minor rock and mud slides with a few trees mixed in.
    As I said, they are minor, but in a stretch of 60 miles, they begin to add up. There seem to be more than in past winters.
    Yesterday, as I sat and waited while the state crew cleared some mud and rocks from the highway, I wondered if everything in this long stretch is slipping and sliding a bit.

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