Entries Tagged as ''

And The Quakes Go On!

map 0.5  2012/02/24 06:34:06 45.289N 121.684W  5.6
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.5  2012/02/24 01:12:04 45.298N 121.685W  6.2
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.6  2012/02/24 00:13:55 45.278N 121.680W  1.3
25 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.3  2012/02/23 19:21:00 45.284N 121.681W  5.0
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 1.0  2012/02/23 18:25:42 45.299N 121.689W  5.4
23 km (14 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR


What Happened Near Mt Hood?

map 0.7  2012/02/23 18:15:02 45.292N 121.683W  5.7
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.2  2012/02/23 17:18:11 45.292N 121.684W  5.9
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 1.0  2012/02/23 16:12:33 45.295N 121.688W  5.2
23 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.5  2012/02/23 15:47:59 45.298N 121.685W  6.1
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.5  2012/02/23 15:15:06 45.301N 121.681W  6.2
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.5  2012/02/23 15:10:57 45.294N 121.684W  5.8
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 1.0  2012/02/23 13:51:37 45.297N 121.684W  5.8
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.5  2012/02/23 13:31:11 45.298N 121.686W  6.2
23 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.6  2012/02/23 13:29:55 45.296N 121.685W  6.0
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.9  2012/02/23 13:27:39 45.301N 121.683W  5.8
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 1.5  2012/02/23 13:26:15 45.320N 121.694W  5.8   
22 km (14 mi) E   of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.5  2012/02/23 13:15:50 45.322N 121.683W  7.6
23 km (14 mi) SSW of  Parkdale, OR
map 1.7  2012/02/23 13:09:04 45.319N 121.695W  6.4
22 km (14 mi) E   of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.2  2012/02/23 13:05:11 45.297N 121.683W  5.9
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 1.6  2012/02/23 13:03:59 45.036N 122.412W  0.0
18 km (11 mi) SE  of  Molalla, OR
map 0.7  2012/02/23 12:58:25 45.299N 121.684W  5.9
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.2  2012/02/23 12:56:47 45.300N 121.685W  6.2
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.3  2012/02/23 12:50:28 45.298N 121.684W  6.3
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR

But, no danger of explosion.


Mt Hood & Lowell Quakes

map 0.1  2012/02/23 12:36:28 45.314N 121.677W  7.1
23 km (15 mi) SSW of  Parkdale, OR
map 0.1  2012/02/23 12:36:15 45.327N 121.681W  7.3
22 km (14 mi) SSW of  Parkdale, OR
map 0.9  2012/02/23 12:32:43 45.295N 121.684W  5.9
24 km (15 mi) ESE of  Mount Hood Village, OR
map 0.9  2012/02/23 12:10:15 44.062N 122.732W  0.0
16 km (10 mi) NNE of  Lowell, OR


Andrew Klavan Remembers Gary Carter


“Gary Carter Showed Me How to Play the Game”

by Andrew Klavan

I never met baseball Hall of Famer Gary “Kid” Carter, but his death last week from brain cancer at age 57 moved me deeply. Some 25 years ago, his life and his style of play spoke to me and inspired me in a moment of terrible need. It was an example of what celebrity can do when it’s done well.

The second half of my life has been so bright with blessings that it’s difficult for me to think back to the 1980s, when I could see no end to my emotional pain. Personal demons left me blind to the gifts that God had showered on me so generously. I began to think my beautiful wife and baby daughter would be better off without me.

I can’t really say how serious I was when I began to contemplate suicide. But I remember one night, sitting alone in my room in darkness, smoking cigarette after cigarette as I considered the ways in which I might put an end to myself.

The radio was on, playing a Mets game. I’d been trying to listen before the dark thoughts took over. By the time the ninth inning came around, I wasn’t paying attention at all.

One sentence ran through my mind again and again: “I don’t know how I can live.”

Before I knew it, the game had ended and Carter—who apparently had beaten out a grounder to reach first base—was giving a postgame interview. The interviewer asked him how he managed to outrun the throw when his knees were so bad from years of playing catcher, squatting behind home plate.

Associated Press

New York Mets player Gary Carter in 1985

Carter was a devout Christian with just the bright, inspiring Tim Tebow sort of personality our media can’t stand. He was forever thanking Jesus Christ in postgame interviews. He once remarked that he could see the smiles curdle on the faces of unbelieving journalists when he did it, but he felt he had to tell the truth.

I was not a Christian then—not yet—and if Carter had preached religion at that moment, it would have gone right past me. But he didn’t. He said something else, something much simpler but also true. I don’t remember the words exactly but a fair translation would be this: “Sometimes you just have to play in pain.”

Carter’s words somehow broke through my self-pitying despair. “Play in pain?” I thought. “Hell, I can do that. That’s one thing I actually know how to do.”

I had been looking for answers but I didn’t know the answers. I had been looking for solutions, but solutions were for another day. It hadn’t occurred to me that maybe, for now at least, the only way to go on living was to do like the great athletes do and just tough it out.

I did tough it out, and I got therapeutic help, and I abandoned lifelong self-destructive habits and thoughts. And had I known in that moment how very close I was to genuine mental health and happiness, I would have slapped myself stupid for ever thinking to end it all.

Gary Carter didn’t save my life. He was just a ballplayer I’d never met. He didn’t have that power. But because he was how he was and played how he played and spoke with a brash, sunny optimism that made journalists hate him—well, let’s say he lit a candle when a little bit of light made all the difference.

Celebrities don’t owe us entry to their personal lives in payment for their fame. They have the same right to fail and sin and learn that the rest of us do. But when I see athletes behave like thugs on the field—when I hear pop stars romanticize alcohol and drugs and cheap sex with hummable tunes that make self-destruction palatable to the young, or when I see actors star in films that make recklessness and stupidity look cool and admirable—I think they are throwing away a precious opportunity to be something better than they are.

No one can demand that celebrities live well, but I don’t think it’s too much to ask them to behave well and be a little bit careful about what they say and represent. They are role models whether they like it or not. And someone might be listening to them in the dark.

So goodbye, Kid. And thanks. You did it the way it ought to be done.

Mr. Klavan is a novelist, screenwriter, and contributing editor to City Journal.


U-Socket USB Wallplug

Here’s a cool gadget: the U-Socket USB Wallplug. Right now I’m looking at my wall plug by my desk. I have one plug for my Power strip and one plug dedicated to my cell phone charger. How much more simple it would be to have this USB Wallplug throughout the house.


3.4 Off Oregon Coast

MAP 3.4 2012/02/20 12:13:58 43.730 -127.095 9.9

227 km (141 mi) WNW of Bandon, OR

The Fear Index To Levitate!

What happens to Obama’s prospects in November when high unemployment is added to rising inflation? It’s called the Fear Index and the higher it is the worse it is for the sitting President.

Tyler Durden at Zero Hedge writes this morning:

JPM brings some less than good news for the administration, which unless planning to propose another $500 billion or so gas price offsetting fiscal stimulus (which would bring total US debt to $17 trillion by the end of 2012) may find itself with the bulk of its electorate unable to drive to the voting booths come November. In a just revised crude forecast, JPM commodity analyst Larry Eagles, has hiked both his Crude and Brent expectations across the board, and now sees WTI going from $105 currently to a $120 by the end of the year, $4 higher than his prior forecast. Alas, since in another report from this morning titled “Return of Asset Reflation” JPM finally figures out what we have been saying for months, namely that the stealthy global central bank liquidity tsunami is finally spilling out of equity markets and into everything else, inflation is about to become a substantially topic in pre-election propaganda. As a reminder, when gold was at $1900 last summer, central banks had pumped about $2 trillion less into the markets. We expect the market to grasp this discrepancy shortly.

In January, I predicted this would happen at Market Bugle in my post Did You See Oil?

The Big One In The NW

Scientists studying the Japanese quake say that the Northwest has similar geology to Japan and conclude that magnitude of future quakes in our area could be more damaging than previously thought.

Book Review: “Dollars & Uncommon Sense” By Steve Repak, CFP

“Dollars & Uncommon Sense” basic training for your money

By Steve Repak, CFP

Paperback: 166 pages
Publisher: RFS Publishing (2012)

Steve Repak describes basic training in “Dollars & Uncommon Sense” and defines it as a time when “…a soldier goes through a process of mental and emotional retraining so he can operate in an environment very different from the civilian world.” It’s a time when a soldier learns new skills so he will be ready for anything. That’s exactly what he recommends we do today to survive in our financial world. His book seeks to transform the way we think about money and give us the skills to build wealth.

When you are finished with reading his book, you will stop using common sense, and start using uncommon sense, that is: doing what most people don’t do. Many believe it is the American way to go into debt to buy what you want now. An example of using uncommon sense is buying a car. Rather than buying a car and suffer a 20% decline in value when you drive your car off the dealer’s lot, find the car you want, figure out the monthly payment and put that money aside each month for year. After a year, buy the same car with a down payment of the money you saved and the car is 20% cheaper. Only now you have you saved money on the car, and you know you can afford the payment.

As I read the book, I kept thinking about the U.S. and the way our leaders manage our finances. Repak writes that making more money won’t solve your spending problems. No matter how much more you make, you will spend more than you take in, if you don’t think about money differently.

How does “Dollars & Uncommon Sense” differ from popular Dave Ramsey? Ramsey advises to be totally debt free. Repak believes as Ramsey does, that debt is a four-letter word, but believes you can have a mortgage, since it is so hard to come up with a 25% down payment and he thinks you can go into debt to start a business.

This book should be required reading for everyone of this country if we are to survive financially.



Oregon Experiences Two Three More


map 1.5  2012/02/17 11:41:36 42.425N 122.778W  0.0
5 km ( 3 mi) E   of  White City, OR

map 1.3 2012/02/17 10:14:30 43.564N 123.284W 0.04

km ( 2 mi) S of Yoncalla, OR

map 0.1 2012/02/16 23:02:03 45.360N 121.701W 4.2

1 9 km (12 mi) SSW of Parkdale, OR


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