Entries Tagged as 'Banking'

Why No Credit Check Payday Loans Are Popular

One of the best features about payday loans is that they are no credit check payday loans.  This opens up borrowing cash to just about anyone, regardless of past credit history.  It is a good option for those who have had previous credit problems or who have a poor credit history.  It is necessary for most people who want to get payday loans to have an active bank account, show proof of regular income, and be an adult. 

The payday loan industry is not regulated by the government in the same manner as regular financial institutions like banks or credit unions.  They can charge extremely high interest rates, virtually whatever they want to charge.  This does not matter to someone who needs money fast for an emergency medical bill or car repair.  On a typical loan until a next payday, the interest fee runs between 15% and 25% on average for a cash advance payday loan. Looked at on an annual basis, this could be in the hundreds to thousands of percent for the loan. 

There is no credit check, but the payday loan industry does have their industry check system.  If you have previously defaulted on a payday loan, you most likely will be denied another.  At some lenders, if you had to make a payment plan to settle out and pay off a previous payday loan, they keep records and will not extend you another loan.  This makes sense because the types of loans they make are high-risk loans that are taken out by people who have a history of not making payments.  For the higher risk they take, payday loan businesses charge very high interest rates. 

This industry is obviously thriving and popular; there are payday loan stores everywhere around the country.  Millions of no credit check payday loans are made each day, 24/7, including over the Internet.  Many who use payday loans find that they must continue to use payday loans every month.  A poor money manager, someone who is experiencing a work shortage, or those who cannot budget or pay bills in a timely manner continue the bad habit of taking out repeat loans again and again.  This can be a difficult trap to get out of, and for this reason the government has placed some limitations on the number of concurrent payday loans people may take out in some states. 

No credit check payday loans do serve a welcome purpose to many borrowers.  It is a money maker that is backed by some of the same financial institutions who are unable to charge high interest fees for the loans they make in their regular banks or credit unions.  Those who use this service enjoy having it available, especially in an emergency.  There are positives and negatives to no credit check payday loans; the borrower must decide if the fees are worth the expense.  The other option for those borrowers is to either locate additional income to pay their bills, learn to manage their money better, or to find loans at a better rate. 

Fast Personal Loan

 

Millions of people every day are getting a fast personal loan. Local payday lender stores and online cash advance websites offer this type of loan at reasonable prices. Most begin at $100 and loans are as high as $1500. A fast personal loan is also known as a payday loan, a cash advance loan, quick cash loan, no fax loan, overnight loan, bad credit loans, and several other terms.

 

All refer to a small, short-term loan for a small amount of cash. The borrower has a short time until repayment is due, usually at their next pay date. 
Banks, credit unions, and other larger financial institutions do not, or cannot, make small loans under about $500, because they are unable to turn a profit. The government restricts the amount of interest they can charge to around 36%. The payday and cash advance lenders have no restrictions. A common beginning interest rate for these lenders is around 456% and can go over 2000%. While this sounds sky-high, the actual fee is just $15 to $25 for every $100 that is borrowed. On a small $100 loan, this is much less than a fee a bank would charge for an overdrawn check. If you are in danger of a check bouncing, getting a small payday loan can save you some money. 

 

Many short-term lenders will begin with a small fast personal loan limit, such as $100 to $300, based on the borrower’s income level. Monthly income requirements are around $1000 per month, varying with each lender. Active members of the military are prohibited from taking out payday loans. Having a job with adequate income, or some other source of regular income is mandatory. 

 

The lenders use the banking system for their backup. At a land-based store, you will be asked to write out a check for your loan amount plus fee, and leave it with them. When you return to pay your loan in cash, they return your check. If you want them to shred the check, just ask. If you decide to use an online payday lender for your fast personal loan, you will approve an ACH withdrawal, which means they will automatically take the repayment amount directly out of your bank account on the due date. 

These loans are true loans, with no collateral. There is no need to fax information to the online lenders in most situations. No credit history is required, there is no reporting of your activity to credit bureaus, and no one checks your credit. Your loan is backed by your check, or the ACH withdrawal approval. If you default on your loan, it will be treated just like a bad check. This will also probably prevent you from getting any future loans. 

The fast personal loan is a financial convenience, and you can use the money for anything you wish. Some online loans are processed and delivered within one hour. At a loan store, you walk out with cash immediately. No questions are asked about why you need money, or what you will do with the loan. The loan process is short and fast, and approvals come in minutes.
Online lenders direct deposit the loan money in an hour, to same or next day. Usually, the states limit you to having just two of these loans active at any one time. The short-term loan is great for emergencies, unexpected bills, repair work, travel, or just for fun. A fast personal loan is not, however, meant to become a lifestyle or source of income. 

Top Ways To Protect Your Finances When Buying Online

Top Ways To Protect Your Finances When Buying Online

Buying and selling online is big business across the world. In 2017, 1.66 billion individuals purchased products on the net and this figure is expected to increase further in 2018. However, numerous fraudulent practices are targeting e-commerce businesses, and are risking the finances of individuals up and down the country. With many seeking out the American dream, losing your cash after innocently shopping on the net is a devastating blow. Thankfully, there’s no need to worry if you take onboard these top buying tips when you next shop online.

Be vigilant

South America is currently emerging as a hotspot for identity fraud as a result of cyber criminals hacking into e-commerce systems and stealing the personal data of online shoppers. Most people don’t think twice about entering their date of birth, address and bank account details when shopping online, but have you ever stopped to think about what happens to this data once your parcel has been dispatched? You should choose the sites you purchase from and provide your personal details to wisely, even if it sometimes means you have to pay a few more dollars for your goods.  Always be on the lookout for signs that something isn’t legit with the company, such as no reviews or feedback.

Check the site’s security status

It would be fair to say that a large proportion of people don’t stop to check that the e-commerce site they’re purchasing from is secure before proceeding to make a purchase, but if you want to protect your finances from criminals you need to avoid getting over excited and rushing ahead to the checkout. A secure website will start with https rather than http and your browser bar will confirm the security of the site by showing a padlock. Consider using Chrome as your browser when shopping online as from July 2018, all http websites will be marked as ‘not secure’, making it easier for you to identify that the online shop is one to steer clear of.

Know your rights

As you don’t get to physically see or hold an item before you buy it online, consumers usually have better rights. You should always take the time to read the e-commerce site’s terms of sale including their refund policy before you buy any goods and it’s always worth making online purchases with a credit card as, if a problem occurs, you can dispute the charge. It’s wise to utilize an e-commerce site that has a reputation for providing good customer service and support, both before and after the sale, as these are the sites that care and appreciate you as a customer. It is a sign that they will do their utmost to protect the data they hold on you, including your bank account information.

Buying goods online is an efficient and convenient way of shopping for billions of people each year. However, many consumers need to put more effort into keeping their data and financial information secure when on the net. Being vigilant about who you buy from and what personal data you’re giving out is vital while checking the security status of every site you visit is a must. Take the time to read up on your rights, too, before checking out and freely handing over your personal data as this will provide you and your finances with ultimate protection.

 Jenny Holt jennyholt@accurasend.net

We Have Seen This Before

We Have Seen This Before

We Have Seen This Before

We Have Seen This Before! The Fuse on the Subprime 2.0 Debt Bomb is About to Ignite, says Graham Summers, Chief Market Strategist Phoenix Capital Research:

The Subprime 2.0 story is now gaining traction in the financial media.

By way of brief review, here is the template for Subprime 1.0 (the mortgage meltdown).

1)   Banks, hungry for profits, began issuing mortgages to sub-prime borrowers (people who couldn’t possibly pay the loans back).

2)   Housing prices and sales began to fall.

3)   Subprime borrowers began defaulting on their mortgage.

4)   Subprime mortgage lenders began to collapse.

5)   A crisis unfolds as the issue spreads throughout the banks.

Subprime 2.0 is following the exact same pattern. Just replace the words “housing” with “automobiles” and “mortgages” with “auto-loans.” As the Wall Street Journal  notes…

We Have Seen This Before! Banks Pull Back on Car Loans as Used-Auto Prices Plummet

Car loans have been among the fastest growing consumer lending categories since the last recession. Banks and other lenders began increasing originations about seven years ago in search of more revenue as the mortgage market slumped.

As competition intensified, lenders loosened underwriting standards by courting borrowers with lower credit scores and extending repayment periods on loans. Small nonbank lenders also jumped in, relying on the bond market as an outlet to sell their loans.

But increasing losses have sapped some banks’ enthusiasm. Annualized net losses on securitized subprime auto loans increased to more than 10% late last year, the highest level since February 2009, according to Fitch Ratings. The figure slipped back to 9% in March, but that was the highest loss reading for that month since at least 2001.

Source: WSJ

In terms of the above template Subprime Template, we’re currently at #3 and on our way to #4.

All we need now is some auto-lenders to start blowing up, and the fuse on the Subprime 2.0 Debt Bomb will have been lit.

Keep an eye on Ally Financial (ALLY) and Capital One (COF). Both have large auto-loan exposure.

When Subprime 2.0 ignites the markets will move into crisis mode.


The Fed’s “Debt Monster” Is Calling the Shots

The Fed’s “Debt Monster”

Bill Bonner calls our attention to the danger:

You know our prediction: The Fed will never willingly lead interest rates to a neutral position.

It can’t. The FED  has created a debt monster. It must feed this Frankenstein with easy credit.

This time last year, the Fed began its “rate-tightening cycle.” That is, it began raising short-term interest rates.

It pledged to continue to do so in 2016. But then it diddled and dawdled, fiddled and fawdled… claiming to be on top of the situation… watching its “data” come in like a fisherman’s wife waiting for the return of the fleet… and not wanting to admit she was already a widow.

What it was really waiting for was a place to hide.

The Fed can raise short-term rates. But it will have to follow, not lead. It will have to hide in the shadow of rising consumer prices, staying “behind the curve” of inflation expectations.

That way, the expected real interest rate – the rate of return on your money above the rate of consumer price inflation – never really returns to neutral.

Already, the price of a barrel of crude oil – a key input into prices across the economy – is twice what it was 10 months ago. Leading business-cycle research firm the Economic Cycle Research Institute says the inflation cycle has turned positive.

And already, foreign nations are talking about retaliating against Team Trump by canceling orders and imposing new tariffs in their own versions of “better trade deals.”

This, too, is bound to raise prices.

Forget speculating on stocks, options, or other risky, low-probability moneymaking schemes. This wealth-building formula is the most reliable way to make seven figures in seven years or less in today’s uncertain economy…

Funny Money Antics

But if consumer price inflation were really a concern, the bond market would race ahead of the Fed, imposing its own regimen of rising yields.

The Fed’s increases would be too little and too late to have any real effect on the outcome.

Bondholders don’t care much about nominal rates. If consumer price inflation were to rise to the Fed’s 2% target, for example, bondholders might clamor for a 4% yield to give them a positive 2%.

That is a big increase over the 52-week low of 1.32% the yield on the 10-year Treasury note hit on July 4.

But you don’t get that kind of seismic shift without cracking some flower pots.

Much of the world’s $225 trillion in debt is calibrated to borrowers who will have a hard time surviving a 3% interest rate world, let alone a 4% one.

This is an economy that can stand a lot of grotesque and absurd “funny money” antics. It can survive a bizarre financial world; it can’t survive a normal one.

As inflation expectations increase, investors do not sit still and watch their retirements, their savings, and their fortunes get broken by inflation.

They don’t wait for the Fed’s policy-setting committee to meet. They don’t reflect calmly as the Fed’s wonks collect their “data” and create their “dot plots.”

Instead, they act out. The monster gets mad and starts throwing things.

First through the window are the bonds. They get chucked out before inflation manifests itself fully… and long before the Fed increases its key short-term rate.

Then, the “boom” turns quickly into stagflation… as higher borrowing costs pinch off growth even as consumer prices continue to rise.

But more likely, inflation is not really surging… Not yet.

And most likely, it will be the painfully apparent when the U.S. economy goes into recession next year.

Then, it will be stocks’ turn to get tossed out, while bonds sneak back in through the side door.

It will also be apparent that the Fed has taken another false step… that the recovery was a sham… and that it’s the debt monster calling the shots, not Janet Yellen.

Regards,

Bill Bonner

What does the new frontier of negative interest rates in the global arena mean for investors?

What does the new frontier of negative interest rates in the global arena mean for investors?

What does the new frontier of negative interest rates in the global arena mean for investors?

 

Cindy Yeap / The Edge Malaysia discusses “What does the new frontier of negative interest rates in the global arena mean for investors?”

“For RHB Research Institute executive chairman and chief economist Lim Chee Sing, NIRP “can only be seen as a temporary expedient to hold up financial markets”, albeit one that has little room to push for more economic growth in this relatively mature stage of the growth cycle.

“That means rising investment premiums and heightened market volatility will likely be the order of the day in the days ahead. Portfolio investors may have no choice but to build some degree of defensiveness into their portfolios to balance out the risks. This implies rising appetite for high-yield stocks,” Lim says.

“Even dividend stocks have caveats in the days ahead, largely due to their rich valuations vis-à-vis tougher conditions to grow at the same rate as before. For example, sin stocks might have to contend with higher taxes; the fees for telecommunications spectrum refarming have yet to be revealed; and consumer stocks have to contend with the possibility of a further tightening of consumer spending. Then, there is the higher labour cost.

“The focus should be on stocks with an improved business model, reasonable earnings visibility, strong cash flow, a dividend policy and, thus, sustainable dividend payments. Of course, one cannot ignore valuations but rich valuation stocks are still susceptible to a selldown should the global economy take a turn for the worse,” Lim adds.

“Gerald Ambrose, CEO of Aberdeen Islamic Asset Management Sdn Bhd, too, noted expensive valuations after a good run in recent years.

“We are keeping a close eye on notable high-yield companies, like the cellular phone companies, the brewers, tobacco companies and the REITs (real estate investment trusts). We’re currently about halfway though the 4Q2015 results season and to be honest, a lot of the better-managed companies have been able to find efficiencies to enable dividend payout to remain high. However, after outperforming for over a year, a lot of the high dividend yield companies are hardly cheap,” he says.”

BOTTOM LINE: Focus your strategy on yield and gold. Gold is an alternative when interest rates are negative adjusted for taxes and inflation.

The Difference Between a Good Analyst and a Great Analyst

I came across this piece from Quandl and it got me thinking about about politics and experts and analysts. Quandl is a data site that offers information on thousands of stocks, with historical data going back decades and futures data to help you forecast trends. They created this graphic to help novice analysts get ahead in the industry.
the Difference Between a Good and a Great Analyst

I love to talk politics. My dad and I conversed and analysed and argued about the Vietnam War and every other thing that was worth discussing. Sometimes they were heated. College was a disappointment. I thought there were would be more conversations in depth much like the ones between dad and me. Sadly, that only occurred in the classroom … infrequently. In my adult life, once in a while there is a conversation I look back on with fondness. Those conversations  with new friends or in depth conversations over a fine dinner. Today, it is hard to have conversations when each participant is holding on to biases and attaching their ego to those opinions.

I want to have conversations with great analysts.

When I was a broker, I made the most money for my clients when I could analyse the facts, and draw conclusions from those facts that were outside the norm. If you saw The Big Short you saw great analysts reach conclusions that were farseeing. The consequences of their conclusions were far reaching.made them huge piles of money.

It is one thing to develop a story about the future of Germany or Cuba if you are a citizen, another thing altogether to draw the conclusion that being Jewish in Germany is existential; it is another thing to be Cuban and realize that the door to Spain is the only escape and it will close soon.

To stand in a place and observe that a country that spends more than it takes in and builds up debt to the point that they can barely pay the interest is a good analyst. To be a great analyst it takes courage to conclude that this cannot stand and it’s time to leave.

Great analysts tell stories that are believable and motivate others to take action. Strive to become a great analyst.

How to Play the Situations In China and Greece

The following is an excerpt from Private Wealth Advisory...

Stocks are rallying today because of:

1)   Hype and hope of a Greek deal.

2)   China has stopped trading of 49% of stocks and threatened to arrest anyone who is short-selling the market (talk about a backstop!).

Regarding Greece, no deal has been made. Greek PM Tsipras has submitted a proposal for a new deal… which is almost EXACTLY the same as the deal that 61% of the Greek population rejected via referendum last week.

Tsipras has completely backed himself into a corner. He used up a lot of goodwill with EU officials when he let Greece default by staging a referendum for Greek voters AFTER the due date on Greece’s debt.

The voters obviously voted “No” on the EU’s deal… so Tsipras has had to come up with a new proposal. The only thing he can suggest that would possibly sit well with Greek voters is “debt forgiveness,” which Germany has stated it is absolutely opposed to.

So now Tsipras must decide… does take a bad deal (the same one voters said “no” to last week), which will force a popular revolt in Greece (and likely his expulsion from office) or is he the man who takes Greece out of the Eurozone?

 

His finance minister has already quit his post… and doesn’t seem too upset about it. Perhaps Tsipras will follow suit, Greece will elect another PM and the whole charade can start all over again?

Finance.jpg

The Greek drama has engaged in “extend and pretend” for five years now. It’s highly likely that it will continue this time around with Greece accepting a bad deal and plunging further into economic collapse until the next debt problem emerges.

As for China…

Anyone who bothered to look at the actual data coming out of China (the un-massaged data, not the fictitious GDP numbers), knew the China economy was in collapse. It was only a matter of time before its stock bubble joined suit.

Sure enough, the bubble burst, and the Chinese stock market has erased over $3 trillion in wealth in the space of three weeks.

The Chinese Government, which we are told is moving towards free market capitalism, has thus far dealt with the crisis by halting 49% of stocks from trading and threatening to arrest (and likely “disappear”) anyone caught short-selling stocks or somehow promoting market “instability.”

The market is bouncing on this… it’s now coming up against the first line of resistance (blue line) established by the uptrend from late 2014. If we break above that we could even bounce to retest the longer-term bubble bull market trendline (green line).

However, after that we’re heading DOWN in a big way. The bubble has burst. Bubbles NEVER reflate after bursting.

7-10-15-1.png

Crises never unfold in straight lines. Investors forget that when the Tech Bubble burst, stocks were a roller coaster with over EiGHT moves of 16% or greater in the span of six months.

7-10-15-2.jpg

China’s bubble was even larger than the Tech Bubble. The price volatility will be even more severe… but the bubble has definitively burst… and the market will be heading lower in the coming weeks.

In short… the two biggest reasons for the markets to be rallying today (Greece and China) are simply temporary issues. They will resolve, very likely for the worse, in the coming weeks. Smart investors should be using this bounce to prepare for the next wave of the Crisis.

If you’re looking for actionable investment strategies to profit from this trend we highly recommend you take out a trial subscription to our paid premium investment newsletter Private Wealth Advisory.

The Next Currency Crisis Has Begun

According to Graham Summers of Phoenix Capital Research The Next Currency Crisis Has Begun. 

Stocks have been boring for months now. They’ve gone almost nowhere since the start of the year.
The REAL action is in the currency markets.
The biggest news is the breakdown of the Japanese Yen. Normally it’s a big deal if a currency breaks a trendline that is over five years long.
The Yen just broke a 30 year trendline.

Image

The significance of this cannot be overstated… one of the major world currencies has broken support dating back to the mid-80s. This sets the stage for a collapse to 60 if not 40 in the coming months.
The Yen collapse represents a 33%-50% currency collapse. It is nothing short of a hyperinflationary event.
The impact will be felt around the globe, most notably in Asia where other currencies will be in absolute chaos.
However, the Yen also is a major currency partner with the US Dollar and the Euro… and a Japanese currency collapse will be felt in those regions as well. Stocks will be the last asset class to “get it.”

Charging Clients on Deposits

Banning cash transactions and then charging for deposits seems to be our future. Now this is the latest:

HSBC has become one of the biggest global banks to say it will begin charging clients on deposits in a basket of European currencies to prevent its profit margins from being crushed in a record low-interest rate environment. The unusual steps come after the ECB became the first big central bank to announce a negative deposit rate – in effect a penalty on banks parking their surplus cash – last year. HSBC -0.5% premarket.

Largest Bank In America Joins War On Cash

Largest Bank In America Joins War On Cash

I have cautioned investors for many years not to store gold and silver in safe deposit boxes, now Largest Bank In America Joins War On Cash. I said you may not be able to gain access to your box when you really need it. Now look what the largest bank in the U.S. is doing. Chase even goes as far as to prohibit the storage of cash in its safe deposit boxes. In a letter to its customers dated April 1, 2015 pertaining to its “Updated Safe Deposit Box Lease Agreement,” one of the highlighted items reads: “You agree not to store any cash or coins other than those found to have a collectible value.” Whether or not this pertains to gold and silver coins with no numismatic value is not explained.

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